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Painting with Watercolors or Tempera - KinderArt Littles, Preschool, Daycare and Early Childhood Education Activities and Lessons
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PAINTING WITH WATERCOLORS OR TEMPERA [From: Artmaking]
Written by: Andrea Mulder-Slater [Andrea is one of the creators of KinderArt.com]

Age:

2-5 years

Activity Summary:

If you have watercolor or tempera paints, brushes and a glass of water, you have everything you need to give a child a creative break.


What You Need:

•Watercolor paint
•Paintbrushes
•Water and containers to hold the water
•Paper towel or dry cloth
•White paper (computer paper will work fine - watercolor paper or thick poster paper is better)

What You Do:

  1. First, make sure you have plenty of paper. For watercolors, it is best to use a thicker paper - like poster board or even watercolor paper. Computer paper will work fine but be aware that the wetter it becomes, the higher the chance of the paper tearing.

  2. Next, provide your child with a nice flat place to work.

  3. Set out some watercolours or tempera paints. Tempera blocks are similar to watercolor blocks in that they need to have water to make them work.

  4. Demonstrate to your child how much or how little water is required to make the paint "liquidy".

  5. Then simply allow your child to experiment with the paints. Encourage them to try to keep the colors clean by rinsing the paintbrush in between colors. Also, point out when new colors are formed on the paper (yellow and blue make green, blue and red make purple, red and orange make green).

  6. Remember, this is not about creating a final product - this is just about the process of working with art materials.

  7. When your child is finished with one painting, provide him/her with another sheet of paper. Do this until she tires of the activity.

  8. You can ask your child about his/her painting. Say things like, "Tell me about your picture." and "Why did you choose those colors?" rather than telling your child what the picture looks like to you.

  9. As always, praise your child for a job well done.
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