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Tips and Ideas for Preschool and Daycare: Early Childhood Education


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Alphabet/Pre-Writing
Artmaking
Color
Cooperation
Health
History
Imagination/Play
Multicultural
Music
Numbers/Math
Oceans/Lakes
Recipes
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Self-Awareness
Sensory Activities
Science/Nature
Sorting/Matching
Special Days/Seasons
Stories/Poems
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TIPS


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TIPS FOR PARENTS AND/OR CAREGIVERS


KinderArt® Toddler Aprons



Jannique says... Children who aren't challenged become bored. But children who are pushed along too quickly or who are asked to do things that don't interest them, can become frustrated and unhappy. [More Tips Here]

TIPS

If you share things with others, your child also will learn to be thoughtful of others' feelings.
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Talk about the exciting things that he will do in kindergarten, such as making art projects, singing and playing games.
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You don't have to be an excellent reader for your child to enjoy reading aloud together.
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When your child starts to recognize letters and perhaps words, you can call her attention to words that appear often or that she has learned to recognize from other reading.
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Babies need to become attached to at least one person who provides them with security and love. This first and most basic emotional attachment is the start for all human relationships.
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Babies begin to understand how the world works when they see, touch, hold and shake things. It also helps them to coordinate and strengthen their hand muscles.
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From the very beginning, babies try to imitate the sounds that they hear us make. They "read" the looks on our faces and our movements. Talking, singing, smiling ans gesturing to your child helps her to love and learn to use-language.
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Children who aren't challenged become bored. But children who are pushed along too quickly or who are asked to do things that don't interest them, can become frustrated and unhappy.
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When your child starts to recognize letters and perhaps words, you can call her attention to words that appear often or that she has learned to recognize from other reading.
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Children need to hear a lot of words in order to learn how to communicate themselves. It's particularly helpful when you talk about the “here and now”-things that are going on in front of your child.
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Puppets provide another opportunity for you to talk to your child and encourage him to talk to you as well. They also help your child to learn new words, use his imagination and develop hand and finger coordination.
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Movement activities help children to gain control of their large muscles. They also help children to learn new words and important concepts such as locations: up, down, inside, outside, over, behind, beside and under.
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Introduce music to your child early. Music and dance help children learn to listen, to coordinate hand and body movements and to express themselves creatively.
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Cooking with you-following the steps in a recipe-is the perfect way for your child to begin learning how to follow directions and how to count and measure. It can also teach him how things change.
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When reading books is a regular part of family life, you send your child a message that books are important, enjoyable and full of new things to learn.
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Learning to work with and get along with others contributes to children's success in school.
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Home chores can help children learn new words, how to listen and follow directions, how to count and how to sort. Chores can also help children improve their physical coordination and learn responsibility.
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Art projects also help children to develop the eye and hand coordination they will later need as they begin to write.
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Children who know the names and the shapes of the letters of the alphabet when they enter school usually have an easier time learning to read.
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Rhymes are an extension of children's language skills. By hearing and saying rhymes, along with repeated words and phrases, your child learns about spoken sounds and about words. Rhymes also spark a child's excitement about what comes next, which adds fun and adventure to reading.
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Helping your child learn to pay attention to sounds in words can prevent reading problems later on.
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Matching sounds with letters helps your child to learn that the letters he sees in written words represent the sounds he says in words. This is an important step in becoming a successful reader.
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These tips have been taken from Helping Your Preschooler



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